Miami, Florida

Miami is a major city located on the Atlantic coast in southeastern Florida. It is the county seat of Miami-Dade County, and the most populous county in Florida. With a population of 433,136, it is the principal, central, and the most populous metropolis in the Southeastern United States.

Miami is a major center and a leader in finance, commerce, culture, media, entertainment, the arts, and international trade.In 2010, Miami ranked seventh in the United States in terms of finance, commerce, culture, entertainment, fashion, education, and other sectors. It ranked thirty-third among global cities.

In 2008, Miami was ranked as “America’s Cleanest City” according to Forbes Magazine for its year-round good air quality, vast green spaces, clean drinking water, clean streets and city-wide recycling programs. Downtown Miami and South Florida are home to the largest concentration of international banks in the United States, and is home to many large companies both nationally and internationally.

For more than two decades, the Port of Miami, known as the “Cruise Capital of the World” is the number one cruise passenger port in the world accommodating some of the largest cruise ships in the world, and operations and is the busiest in both passenger traffic and cruise lines.

The Miami area was first inhabited for more than one thousand years by the Tequestas, but was later claimed for Spain in 1566 by Pedro Menéndez de Avilés. A Spanish mission was constructed one year later in 1567. In 1836, Fort Dallas was built, and the Miami area subsequently became a site of fighting during the Second Seminole War.

Miami holds the distinction of being “the only major city in the United States conceived by a woman, Julia Tuttle,” who was a local citrus grower and a wealthy Cleveland native. The Miami area was better known as “Biscayne Bay Country” in the early years of its growth. Some published reports described the area as a promising wilderness. The area was also characterized as “one of the finest building sites in Florida.” The Great Freeze of 1894–1895 hastened Miami’s growth, as the crops of the Miami area were the only ones in Florida that survived. Julia Tuttle subsequently convinced Henry Flagler, a railroad tycoon, to expand his Florida East Coast Railroad to the region, for which she became known as “the mother of Miami.” Miami was officially incorporated as a city on July 28, 1896 with a population of just over 300.

Miami prospered during the 1920s with an increase in population and infrastructure but weakened after the collapse of the Florida land boom of the 1920s, the 1926 Miami Hurricane and the Great Depression in the 1930s. When World War II began, Miami, well-situated due to its location on the southern coast of Florida, played an important role in the battle against German submarines. The war helped to expand Miami’s population; by 1940, 172,172 people lived in the city. In the latter half of the 20th century, Miami became a major international, financial, and cultural center.

Brickell Avenue is home to the largest concentration of international banks in the U.S.
The ongoing high-rise construction in Miami, has inspired popular opinion of “Miami manhattanization”.
The Port of Miami is the world’s largest cruise ship port, and is the headquarters of many of the world’s largest cruise companies. Several large companies are headquartered in or around Miami,

Since 2001, Miami has been undergoing a large building boom with more than 50 skyscrapers rising over 400 feet (122 m) built or currently under construction in the city. Miami’s skyline is ranked third most impressive in the U.S., behind New York City and Chicago.

Miami International Airport and the Port of Miami are among the nation’s busiest ports of entry, especially for cargo from South America and the Caribbean. Additionally, Downtown has the largest concentration of international banks in the country located mostly in Brickell, Miami’s financial district. Miami was also the host city of the 2003 Free Trade Area of the Americas negotiations, and is one of the leading candidates to become the trading bloc’s headquarters. Tourism is also an important industry in Miami. The beaches, conventions, festivals and events draw over 12 million visitors annually from across the country and around the world, spending $17.1 billion.[28] The historical Art Deco district in South Beach, is widely regarded[citation needed] as one of the most glamorous in the world for its nightclubs, beaches, historical buildings, and shopping. However, it is important to note that Miami Beach is a separate city from the City of Miami.

Miami is the home to the National Hurricane Center and the headquarters of the United States Southern Command, responsible for military operations in Central and South America. In addition to these roles, Miami is also an industrial center, especially for stone quarrying and warehousing. See Wikipedia for additional information.




Las Vegas, Nevada

Las Vegas is the most populous city in Nevada, it is an internationally renowned major resort city for gambling, shopping and fine dining. Las Vegas, which bills itself as The Entertainment Capital of the World, is famous for the number of casino resorts and associated entertainment. A growing retirement and family city, it is the 28th most populous city in the United States with an estimated population by the U.S. Census Bureau of 567,641 as of 2009. The 2009 population estimate of the Las Vegas metropolitan area was 1,902,834.[2]

Established in 1905, Las Vegas officially became a city in 1911. The city’s tolerance for various forms of adult entertainment earned it the title of Sin City, and this image has made Las Vegas a popular setting for films and television programs. There are numerous outdoor lighting displays on Fremont Street, as well as elsewhere in the city.

Las Vegas started as a stopover on the pioneer trails to the west, and became a popular railroad town in the early 1900s. It was a staging point for all the mines in the surrounding area, especially those around the town of Bullfrog, that shipped their goods out to the rest of the country. With the proliferation of the railroads, Las Vegas became less important but the completion of the nearby Hoover Dam in 1935 resulted in the growth of residents and tourism. The dam, located 30 mi (48 km) southeast of the city, also formed Lake Mead, the US’s largest man-made lake and reservoir. Today, tours are offered into lesser known parts of the dam. The legalization of gambling in 1931 led to the advent of the casino-hotels, for which Las Vegas is famous. Major development occurred in the 1940s. The success of the city’s early casino businesses was owed to American organized crime. Most of the original large casinos were managed or at least funded under mob figures Benjamin “Bugsy” Siegel, Meyer Lansky or other mob figures at this time. The rapid growth of this gambling empire is credited with dooming Galveston, Texas; Hot Springs, Arkansas; and other major gaming centers in the 1950s.

With the arrival in the late 1960s of businessman Howard Hughes, who purchased many casino-hotels, as well as television and radio stations in the city, legitimate corporations began to purchase casino-hotels as well, and the mob was run out by the federal government over the next several years. The constant stream of tourist dollars from the hotels and casinos was also augmented by a new source of federal money. This money came from the establishment of what is now Nellis Air Force Base. The influx of military personnel and casino job-hunters helped start a land building boom which, as of today, has leveled off a bit.

Though Las Vegas’s gambling revenues have been surpassed by Macau, the Las Vegas area remains one of the world’s top entertainment destinations. For more information see Wikipedia.




San Francisco, California

San Francisco, is the 12th most populous city in the United States. With a population of more than 800,00, it is the second most denssely populated city in the US. San Francisco is the financial, cultural, and transportation center of the San Francisco Bay Area, a region of more than 7.4 million people which includes San Jose and Oakland.

Today, San Francisco is a popular international tourist destination. It is well known for its year round chilly temperatures and renowned for its summer fog. It is also known for its steep rolling hills, eclectic mix of Victorian and modern architecture and its famous landmarks, including the Golden Gate Bridge, cable cars, and Chinatown. It is well known for its fine dining establishments and its seafood on Fishermans Wharf. The city is a principal banking and finance center, and the home to more than 30 international financial institutions.

SanFrancisco has a long history, having been first established by the Spanish In 1776 as a fort and a mission.But it is best know for its part in the California Gold Rush in 1848 which propelled the city into a period of rapid growth, increasing the population in one year from 1,000 to 25,000.

Three-quarters of the city was destroyed by the 1906 earthquake and fire. but San Francisco was quickly rebuilt. During World War II, San Francisco was the port of embarkation for service members shipping out to the Pacific Theater. It is well known for its role in the gay rights movement, which has cementing San Francisco as a center of liberal activism in the United States.

San Francisco faced a second major earthquake in 1989 when the Loma Prieta earthquake caused major destruction and loss of life throughout the Bay Area. In San Francisco, the quake severely damaged structures in the Marina and South of Market districts and precipitated the demolition of the damaged Embarcadero Freeway and much of the damaged Central Freeway, allowing the city to reclaim its historic downtown waterfront.

During the dot-com boom of the late 1990s, startup companies invigorated the economy. When the bubble burst in 2001, many of these companies folded, and their employees left, although high technology and entrepreneurship continue to be mainstays of the San Francisco economy. (See Wikipedia for a more in deptj analysis.




Seattle, Washington

The Seattle’s Visitors Bureau describes Seattle is one of the most livable cities in the world. It actually receives less annual rainfall (36 inches) than New York City and Atlanta. Surrounded by lakes, rivers, Puget Sound, and mountains, Seattle is a recreation enthusiast’s dream. The lushness of the foliage has led it to be christened “The Emerald City.” Read the rest of this entry »


Orlando, Florida

Welcome to Orlando, home to Disneyworld, Epcot Center, Seaworld, Universal Studios and many other attractions.

It is a wonderland for children. Adults will also enjoy the many attractions of downtown Orlando as well as day trips to The Kennedy Center, and the Atlantic Beaches or the Gulf Beaches on the west coast of Florida in Pinellas County.




Los Angeles, California

Welcome to Los Angeles
L.A., the City of Angels, the Entertainment Capital of the World is located within Los Angeles County in the state of California

Los Angeles Spanish for “The Angels”) is the most populous city in California and the second most populous in the United States, with a population of 4.06 million[3] on a land area of 498.3 square miles (1,290.6 km2). It is the focal point of the larger Los Angeles-Long Beach-Riverside combined statistical area, which contains nearly 17.8 million people. This makes it the 12th most populous metropolitan area in the world.[4] Los Angeles is also the seat of Los Angeles County, the most populated and one of the most multicultural counties[5] in the United States.

Los Angeles was founded in 1781 by Spanish governor Felipe de Neve. It became a part of Mexico in 1821 following the Mexican War of Independence. In 1848, at the end of the Mexican–American War, Los Angeles and the rest of California were purchased as part of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, thereby becoming part of the United States. Los Angeles was incorporated as a municipality on April 4, 1850, five months later it became a state.

Los Angeles is a world center of business, international trade, entertainment, culture, media, fashion, science, technology, and education.[7][8] It is home to renowned institutions covering a broad range of professional and cultural fields, and is one of the most substantial economic engines within the United States. Los Angeles has been ranked the fifth most powerful and influential city in the world, behind only New York City in the United States. it is the third largest economic center in the world, after the Greater Tokyo Area and the New York metropolitan area. As the home base of Hollywood, it is known as the “Entertainment Capital of the World”, leading the world in the creation of motion pictures, television production, video games, and recorded music. The importance of the entertainment business to the city has led many celebrities to call Los Angeles and its surrounding suburbs home. Los Angeles hosted the 1932 and 1984 Summer Olympics. Los Angeles is also home to renowned universities such as the University of Southern California and the University of California, Los Angeles.

Los Angeles enjoys a Mediterranean climate, with an average of 35 days with measurable precipitation annually.[13]

Downtown Los Angeles saw heavy development from the 1980s to 1990s, including the construction of some of the city’s tallest skyscrapers.
Railroads arrived with the completion of the Southern Pacific line to Los Angeles in 1876.[21] Oil was discovered in 1892, and by 1923 Los Angeles was producing one-quarter of the world’s petroleum.

By 1900, the population had grown to more than 102,000 people,putting pressure on the city’s water supply. 1913’s completion of the Los Angeles Aqueduct, under the supervision of William Mulholland, assured the continued growth of the city.

In the 1920s, the movie and aviation industries flocked to Los Angeles, with continuing growth ensuring that the city suffered less during the Great Depression. In 1932, with population surpassing one million, the city hosted the Summer Olympics.

The post-war years saw an even greater boom, as urban sprawl expanded the city into the San Fernando Valley. In 1960, non-Hispanic whites made up 82% of the population of Los Angeles County.[27] In 1969, Los Angeles became one of the birthplaces of the Internet, as the first ARPANET transmission was sent from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) to SRI in Menlo Park.

In 1984, the city hosted the Summer Olympic Games for the second time. Despite being boycotted by 14 Communist countries, the 1984 Olympics became the most financially successful in history, and only the second Olympics to turn a profit – the other being the 1932 Summer Olympics, also held in Los Angeles.

During the remaining decades of the 20th century, the city was plagued by increasing gang warfare, drug trades, and police corruption[dubious – discuss]. Racial tensions erupted again in 1992 with the Rodney King controversy and the large-scale riots that followed the acquittal of his police attackers. In 1994, the 6.7 Northridge earthquake shook the city, causing $12.5 billion in damage and 72 deaths.

The city is divided into many neighborhoods, many of which were incorporated places or communities that were annexed by the city. There are also several independent cities around Los Angeles, but they are popularly grouped with the city of Los Angeles, either due to being completely engulfed as enclaves by Los Angeles, or lying within its immediate vicinity. Generally, the city is divided into the following areas: Downtown Los Angeles, The Eastside and Northeast Los Angeles, South Los Angeles (still often colloquially referred to as South Central by locals), the Harbor Area, Greater Hollywood, Wilshire, the Westside and the San Fernando and Crescenta Valleys.
Hollywood, a well-known district of Los Angeles, is often mistaken as an independent city (as West Hollywood is).

Important landmarks in Los Angeles include Chinatown, Koreatown, Little Tokyo, Walt Disney Concert Hall, Kodak Theatre, Griffith Observatory, Getty Center, Getty Villa, Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Grauman’s Chinese Theatre, Hollywood Sign, Hollywood Boulevard, Capitol Records Tower, Los Angeles City Hall, Hollywood Bowl, Theme Building, Watts Towers, Staples Center, Dodger Stadium, and La Placita Olvera/Olvera Street.

Grauman’s Chinese Theatre

Griffith Observatory

Capitol Records Building

Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum

Los Angeles is subject to earthquakes due to its location on the Pacific Ring of Fire. The geologic instability has produced numerous faults, which cause approximately 10,000 earthquakes annually. One of the major faults is the San Andreas Fault. Located at the boundary between the Pacific Plate and the North American Plate, it is predicted to be the source of Southern California’s next big earthquake.[34] Major earthquakes to have hit the Los Angeles area include the 1994 Northridge earthquake, the 1987 Whittier Narrows earthquake, the 1971 San Fernando earthquake near Sylmar, and the 1933 Long Beach earthquake. Nevertheless, all but a few quakes are of low intensity and are not felt. The most recent earthquake felt was the 4.4 2010 Pico Rivera earthquake on March 16, 2010. Parts of the city are also vulnerable to Pacific Ocean tsunamis; harbor areas were damaged by waves from the Valdivia earthquake in 1960. The Los Angeles basin and metropolitan area are also at risk from blind thrust earthquakes.

Los Angeles has a Subtropical-Mediterranean climate and receives just enough annual precipitation to avoid Köppen’s BSh (semi-arid climate) classification. Los Angeles enjoys plenty of sunshine throughout the year, with an average of only 35 days with measurable precipitation annually.

The name given by the Chumash tribe of Native Americans for the area now known as Los Angeles translates to “the valley of smoke”[46] because of the smog from native campfires. Owing to geography, heavy reliance on automobiles, and the Los Angeles/Long Beach port complex, Los Angeles suffers from air pollution in the form of smog. The Los Angeles Basin and the San Fernando Valley are susceptible to atmospheric inversion, which holds in the exhausts from road vehicles, airplanes, locomotives, shipping, manufacturing, and other sources. Unlike other large cities that rely on rain to clear smog, Los Angeles gets only 15 inches (380 mm) of rain each year: pollution accumulates over many consecutive days. As pollution levels have dropped in recent decades. The number of Stage 1 smog alerts has declined from over 100 per year in the 1970s to almost zero in the new millennium.

The economy of Los Angeles is driven by international trade, entertainment (television, motion pictures, video games, recorded music), aerospace, technology, petroleum, fashion, apparel, and tourism. Los Angeles is also the largest manufacturing center in the western United States.[55] The contiguous ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach together comprise the fifth-busiest port in the world and the most significant port in the Western Hemisphere and is vital to trade within the Pacific Rim.[55] Other significant industries include media production, finance, telecommunications, law, healthcare, and transportation. The Los Angeles-Long Beach-Riverside combined statistical area (CSA) has a gross metropolitan product (GMP) of $831 billion (as of 2008), making it the third largest economic center in the world, after the Greater Tokyo Area and the New York-Newark-Bridgeport CSA.If counted as a country, the surrounding CSA has the 15th largest economy in the world in terms of nominal GDP.

Los Angeles is often billed as the “Creative Capital of the World”, due to the fact that one in every six of its residents works in a creative industry.[65] According to the USC Stevens Institute for Innovation, “there are more artists, writers, filmmakers, actors, dancers and musicians living and working in Los Angeles than any other city at any time in the history of civilization.”[66]

Los Angeles is home to Hollywood, globally recognized as the epicenter of the motion picture industry. A testament to its preeminence in film, the city plays host to the annual Academy Awards, the oldest and one of the most prominent award ceremonies in the world. Furthermore, there are 54 film festivals every year, which translates into more than one every week.[67] Finally, Los Angeles is home to the USC School of Cinematic Arts, the oldest and largest school of its kind in the United States.

The performing arts play a major role in Los Angeles’ cultural identity. There are over 1,000 musical, theater, dance, and performing groups.[67] According to the USC Stevens Institute for Innovation, “there are more than 1,100 annual theatrical productions and 21 openings every week.”[66] The Los Angeles Music Center is one of the three largest performing arts complexes in the nation.[68] The Walt Disney Concert Hall, the centerpiece of the Music Center, is home to the prestigious Los Angeles Philharmonic. Notable organizations such as Center Theatre Group and the Los Angeles Master Chorale along with the rising Los Angeles Opera are also resident companies of the Music Center. Talent is locally cultivated at premier institutions such as the Colburn School and the USC Thornton School of Music.

There are 841 museums and art galleries in Los Angeles County;[69] Los Angeles has more museums per capita than any other city in the world.[70] The most notable museums are the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (the largest encyclopedic museum west of Chicago), the Getty Center (part of the larger J. Paul Getty Trust, the world’s wealthiest art institution), and the Museum of Contemporary Art. A significant amount of art galleries are concentrated on Gallery Row and thousands are in attendance of the monthly Downtown Art Walk that takes place there.




New York, New York


New York City

New York, nicknamed the “Big Apple” and the “City That Never Sleeps” is known to the world as the center of business and finance; entertainment; media and culture; As the home to the headquarters of the United Nations it is a center for international affairs. Read the rest of this entry »


Pet Friendly New York Hotels

If you are hesitant about travelling because you don’t want to leave your pet behind, you should consider bringing your pet with you. Travelling with a pet is no longer an issue with our Pet-friendly hotels search engine.

Travelling to New York can bea treat for you and your pet as the Big Apple is one of the most pet friendly cities in the world, whether you are just taking a walk through Central Park or going out shopping, your pet will enjoy the trip just as much as you do.

Finding a hotel near the area you want to visit should not be a problem with our powerful Pet-friendly hotels search box, just enter the city of your choice and you will get a list of Pet-Friendly hotels with all the same features you would find on our main site.


Featured Sightseeing Tours


TSA Administrator: ‘We Will Not Negotiate on Security’


TSA Begins Testing New Advanced Imaging Technology Software


Hotels

1. Select a Destination

2. Select your Dates